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Some of our USPP Engineers at the Burlington Power Station as part of their Summer Bridge coursework!

Some of our USPP Engineers at the Burlington Power Station as part of their Summer Bridge coursework!

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And now, an interview with Akol Aguek, our second new International Student Advisor!


Tell us a little bit about yourself…
I am one of the new OIE international student advisors. I was born in Sudan (now South Sudan) but I grew up in Kenya where I attended school from elementary through secondary education. I moved to Burlington, Vermont in the summer of 2001 and have been a Vermont resident for the last 14 years. I am a UVM graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in economics and political science; and a Master’s degree in business administration. I enjoy singing and playing dominoes during my free time.  
What did you do before you came to UVM? 
Immediately after my graduation from UVM, I was offered a job as admissions counselor at the UVM Undergraduate Admissions Office. I worked there for six years. As admissions counselor, I recruited domestic undergraduate students for the University of Vermont and reviewed their applications when they applied for admission. Two years ago, I left UVM for another Master’s degree education at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government where I graduated last month with a Master’s degree in Public Administration focusing on international affairs, education, poverty and social policy. 
What are you most excited about in this new role at UVM? 
What excited me most about my new role at UVM as international student advisor is being able to work with international students to help them achieve their academic dreams here at UVM. International education is one area in the higher education that I have always wanted to get into and fortunately, here I am now as an international student advisor. I am looking forward to learning from you as I help you succeed on American college campus. As a non-native English speaker who was educated at UVM, and has lived in Vermont for 14 years, I am looking forward to using those experiences to help you succeed in achieving your academic dreams here on campus. 
What is your favorite place on earth? 
Lots of places including the United States’ Disney World and Kenyan/Tanzanian Mount Kilimanjaro. I have not been to either place yet. But if I have to pick one, it has to be Mount Kilimanjaro. I have always wanted to hike up to the peak of Mount Kilimanjaro but never had a chance to do it. Hopefully, I will be able to do it someday.  
Tell us at least three more fun facts about yourself 
Fact #1: I swam across Nile River with my dad’s cows multiple times when I was around 8 or 9. 
Fact #2: I was born left handed but switched right handed because my first grade Arithmetic teacher taught me to. It is unusual to see someone write with left hand in Sudan (South Sudan).
Fact #3: Fluent in four languages: Dinka, English, Swahili, and South Sudanese Arabic.

And now, an interview with Akol Aguek, our second new International Student Advisor!

Tell us a little bit about yourself…

I am one of the new OIE international student advisors. I was born in Sudan (now South Sudan) but I grew up in Kenya where I attended school from elementary through secondary education. I moved to Burlington, Vermont in the summer of 2001 and have been a Vermont resident for the last 14 years. I am a UVM graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in economics and political science; and a Master’s degree in business administration. I enjoy singing and playing dominoes during my free time.  

What did you do before you came to UVM?

Immediately after my graduation from UVM, I was offered a job as admissions counselor at the UVM Undergraduate Admissions Office. I worked there for six years. As admissions counselor, I recruited domestic undergraduate students for the University of Vermont and reviewed their applications when they applied for admission. Two years ago, I left UVM for another Master’s degree education at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government where I graduated last month with a Master’s degree in Public Administration focusing on international affairs, education, poverty and social policy.

What are you most excited about in this new role at UVM?

What excited me most about my new role at UVM as international student advisor is being able to work with international students to help them achieve their academic dreams here at UVM. International education is one area in the higher education that I have always wanted to get into and fortunately, here I am now as an international student advisor. I am looking forward to learning from you as I help you succeed on American college campus. As a non-native English speaker who was educated at UVM, and has lived in Vermont for 14 years, I am looking forward to using those experiences to help you succeed in achieving your academic dreams here on campus.

What is your favorite place on earth?

Lots of places including the United States’ Disney World and Kenyan/Tanzanian Mount Kilimanjaro. I have not been to either place yet. But if I have to pick one, it has to be Mount Kilimanjaro. I have always wanted to hike up to the peak of Mount Kilimanjaro but never had a chance to do it. Hopefully, I will be able to do it someday.  

Tell us at least three more fun facts about yourself

Fact #1: I swam across Nile River with my dad’s cows multiple times when I was around 8 or 9.

Fact #2: I was born left handed but switched right handed because my first grade Arithmetic teacher taught me to. It is unusual to see someone write with left hand in Sudan (South Sudan).

Fact #3: Fluent in four languages: Dinka, English, Swahili, and South Sudanese Arabic.

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As you may have heard…the OIE is growing! We recently added two new International Student Advisors, and are pretty excited to keep expanding how we work with our students.  To get to know a bit about these great new teammates, an interview below with Kathryn Gaylord-Miles. And check back soon for an interview with our other new advisor!
Tell us a little bit about yourself…
Hello! Bonjour!  Здравствуйте! I’ll be one of the international student advisors at the OIE.  Come teach me how to say hello in your native language!  I grew up in the US, in the states of Michigan and North Carolina.  I received my bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan in French and Russian and East European Studies and my master’s from Penn State in Higher Education.  When I’m not at work, I like to cook, garden, read and get crafty.  I’m very much a DIY (Do-It-Yourself) kind of person.  I also love to travel.  My last trip was to the Outer Banks of North Carolina.  Just before that, I was in the Middle East for a work-related trip for my last job. 
What did you do before you came to UVM? 
My last job was as an admission counselor for a big school in another part of the country.  I traveled to other countries to recruit high school students, then read their applications if they decided to apply. 
What are you most excited about in this new role at UVM? 
I’m most excited about the opportunity to get to know the international students at UVM!  In my last job, I didn’t have the opportunity to get to know students very well.  I’m very excited to get to work with students in person rather than just with paper files! 
What is your favorite place on earth? 
I have to pick one?!  Yikes!  Right now, I’ll choose Tallinn, Estonia.  I visited several times when I studied abroad in St. Petersburg, Russia. It’s a beautiful city and the people I met were very friendly.  Ask me again in the future though—-I still have a lot of places to visit! 
Tell us at least three more fun facts about yourself 
Fact #1: One of my jobs in college was scooping ice cream at an ice cream parlor.  I didn’t work Ben and Jerry’s, but the ice cream was still pretty good.  It was a very sticky job!
Fact #2: My favorite class in college was called AIDS and America.  It wasn’t a class that was required for either of my majors, but it did fulfill a general education requirement.  If you aren’t at UVM yet, you might not know what a general education or “gen ed” requirement is.  Most bachelor’s degrees in the US require students to take general education classes to ensure that they have a broad-based education that prepares them to think critically and contribute to their community.  I enjoyed AIDS and America because it allowed me to explore a topic about which I didn’t have much knowledge.  The professor was interesting, but he also brought in speakers so that we could look at the issues from different perspectives, including patients, health care workers and researchers.
Fact #3: As you all probably know, there are words in English that sound the same but are spelled differently.  These words are called homophones.  Catherine the Great (empress), Katharine Hepburn (actress) and Katherine Harris (politician) all share my first name.  However, their names are spelled differently than mine is.  The spelling of my name less common.  I don’t know why it’s less common, but I do know why my parents decided to spell my name the way that they did.  I’m named after my grandmother, and that’s the way she spells her name.
Fact #4 (Bonus): I don’t like bananas.  I love most fruits and vegetables, but not bananas. 

As you may have heard…the OIE is growing! We recently added two new International Student Advisors, and are pretty excited to keep expanding how we work with our students.  To get to know a bit about these great new teammates, an interview below with Kathryn Gaylord-Miles. And check back soon for an interview with our other new advisor!

Tell us a little bit about yourself…

Hello! Bonjour!  Здравствуйте! I’ll be one of the international student advisors at the OIE.  Come teach me how to say hello in your native language!  I grew up in the US, in the states of Michigan and North Carolina.  I received my bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan in French and Russian and East European Studies and my master’s from Penn State in Higher Education.  When I’m not at work, I like to cook, garden, read and get crafty.  I’m very much a DIY (Do-It-Yourself) kind of person.  I also love to travel.  My last trip was to the Outer Banks of North Carolina.  Just before that, I was in the Middle East for a work-related trip for my last job.

What did you do before you came to UVM?

My last job was as an admission counselor for a big school in another part of the country.  I traveled to other countries to recruit high school students, then read their applications if they decided to apply.

What are you most excited about in this new role at UVM?

I’m most excited about the opportunity to get to know the international students at UVM!  In my last job, I didn’t have the opportunity to get to know students very well.  I’m very excited to get to work with students in person rather than just with paper files!

What is your favorite place on earth?

I have to pick one?!  Yikes!  Right now, I’ll choose Tallinn, Estonia.  I visited several times when I studied abroad in St. Petersburg, Russia. It’s a beautiful city and the people I met were very friendly.  Ask me again in the future though—-I still have a lot of places to visit!

Tell us at least three more fun facts about yourself

Fact #1: One of my jobs in college was scooping ice cream at an ice cream parlor.  I didn’t work Ben and Jerry’s, but the ice cream was still pretty good.  It was a very sticky job!

Fact #2: My favorite class in college was called AIDS and America.  It wasn’t a class that was required for either of my majors, but it did fulfill a general education requirement.  If you aren’t at UVM yet, you might not know what a general education or “gen ed” requirement is.  Most bachelor’s degrees in the US require students to take general education classes to ensure that they have a broad-based education that prepares them to think critically and contribute to their community.  I enjoyed AIDS and America because it allowed me to explore a topic about which I didn’t have much knowledge.  The professor was interesting, but he also brought in speakers so that we could look at the issues from different perspectives, including patients, health care workers and researchers.

Fact #3: As you all probably know, there are words in English that sound the same but are spelled differently.  These words are called homophones.  Catherine the Great (empress), Katharine Hepburn (actress) and Katherine Harris (politician) all share my first name.  However, their names are spelled differently than mine is.  The spelling of my name less common.  I don’t know why it’s less common, but I do know why my parents decided to spell my name the way that they did.  I’m named after my grandmother, and that’s the way she spells her name.

Fact #4 (Bonus): I don’t like bananas.  I love most fruits and vegetables, but not bananas. 

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The US-Sino Pathway Program (USPP) has kept the same acronym but changed names to be the US-Pathway Program. The reason? It has now expanded beyond China to…Nigeria!
This year we welcomed 16 new students from China and 11 students from the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. 
Here they all are, looking good on the balcony of the Waterman Manor.
More on these awesome students soon!

The US-Sino Pathway Program (USPP) has kept the same acronym but changed names to be the US-Pathway Program. The reason? It has now expanded beyond China to…Nigeria!

This year we welcomed 16 new students from China and 11 students from the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

Here they all are, looking good on the balcony of the Waterman Manor.

More on these awesome students soon!

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Congratulations to Office of International Education Student Worker AMANDA on her graduation! Here she is with Mr. Evan Mills, your dedicated international student advisor.

Congratulations to Office of International Education Student Worker AMANDA on her graduation! Here she is with Mr. Evan Mills, your dedicated international student advisor.